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Hadza Hunter Gatherers, Tanzania

Protecting tropical forests with Hadza Hunter Gatherers and Tatoga Pastoralists around the Yaeda Valley in Tanzania. Hadza have lived in the valley for thousands of years and are 'the last of the first'

Hadza Hunter Gatherers, Tanzania

Protecting tropical forests with Hadza Hunter Gatherers and Tatoga Pastoralists around the Yaeda Valley in Tanzania. Hadza have lived in the valley for thousands of years and are 'the last of the first'

Hadza Hunter Gatherers, Tanzania

Protecting tropical forests with Hadza Hunter Gatherers and Tatoga Pastoralists around the Yaeda Valley in Tanzania. Hadza have lived in the valley for thousands of years and are 'the last of the first'

Hadza helps secure the land rights & acts on the driving forces of deforestation in East Africa

32,000 hectares
area of project

18700
trees protected each year

30,000
tonnes CO2 each year

2012
Operational

PROJECT BRIEF

Working with the Hadza, one of Africa’s last hunter gatherer communities, our partners Carbon Tanzania are reducing deforestation over some 32,000 hectares of forest in the Yaeda Valley. This area has been home to the Hadza for thousands of years. They have a unique language and culture and their forest home is currently under threat of deforestation from outsiders looking for new grazing pastures and from farmers clearing land for crop production.

These forests provide food and shelter for the Hadza who are deeply connected to their land – without these ancient forests the Hadza’s culture and lifestyle would be lost forever.

The project also includes Tatoga Pastoralists and brings these two ethnic groups together to secure land rights and act on deforestation.

The Challenge

  • DEFORESTATION
    Deforestation is being caused by shifting agriculture where people from outside the communities illegally clear forest land.
  • LAND RIGHTS
    Finance generated by the project enables land rights to be strengthened and enforced across the Hadza's ancestral homelands.
  • PROTECTION OF TRADITIONAL LIFESTYLES
    The Hadza are a tiny group of people unique to their area and are some of the last hunter gatherers on earth. They are a living link to an ancient way of being that aligned with the earths systems. Over 1000 Hadza still live around the Yaeda Valley.

HADZA HUNTER GATHERERS PROTECT THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT

A C-LEVEL 101VISIONS MICRO-DOCUMENTARY FILM

Project impact

32,000Hectares of forest

The project is creating community land use plans to designate protected zones and farming zones to reduce conflict and protect forest.

30,000Tonnes CO2 sequestered each year

Prevent deforestation in forests that store over 30,000 tonnes of carbon each year.

975Hadza engaged

As well as around 75% of surviving Hadza Hunter Gatherers, the project also engages with around 7000 Tatoga pastoralists across the 3 village communities. US$25,000 per year is invested into the communities, supporting a health fund, school fees and ongoing village development.

42Jobs created each year

The core team includes 42 people across all 3 villages. Earnings are set by the villages at $40 per month, a great rate of pay for part time work covering about 5 days each month. Hadza project takes community guards (Walizi Wajadi) through professional training to government ranger level and trains Hadza in monitoring carbon update across the Yaeda Valley.

48Tree Species

Hadza is protecting the important tree species for the landscape and ecology of the Yaeda Valley. 48 tree species including the Thorntree or Acacia, the Baobab and Myrrh or Comifera. The Baobab provides a stunning 40% of the nutritional needs of the Hadza. While Myrrh is the 'go to tree' tree for bow making and small bee honey.

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ENGAGE

What people say

we stop deforestation by working with communities to develop land use plans that define and legalise land and resource use. We protect and measure the protection of forests, we create local employment and all of the architecture needed to stop deforestation, which is essentially, these trees have more value standing than cut down. When that’s the reality for rural Tanzanians you can really get started counting trees saved, a much better metric for Tanzania’s future than trees planted.

Marc Baker, Director, Carbon Tanzania

What people say

we stop deforestation by working with communities to develop land use plans that define and legalise land and resource use. We protect and measure the protection of forests, we create local employment and all of the architecture needed to stop deforestation, which is essentially, these trees have more value standing than cut down. When that’s the reality for rural Tanzanians you can really get started counting trees saved, a much better metric for Tanzania’s future than trees planted.

Marc Baker, Director, Carbon Tanzania