Mongolian Nomad Project

First of it's kind project restoring Nomadic practices to enable ecosystem recovery and carbon uptake.

Mongolian Nomad Project

First of it's kind project restoring Nomadic practices to enable ecosystem recovery and carbon uptake.

Mongolian Nomad Project

First of it's kind project restoring Nomadic practices to enable ecosystem recovery and carbon uptake.

First of it's kind project restoring Nomadic practices to enable ecosystem recovery and carbon uptake

77,000 hectares
area of project

174
Nomads familes engaged

20,015
tonnes CO2

2013
Operational

PROJECT BRIEF

Over the last generation, Mongolian Nomads have had to cope with many political and cultural changes. For nomadic communities and herders, their traditional way of life has been disturbed and much of their ancestral knowledge has been eroded.

Many nomads have adopted a more sedentary lifestyle – moving only once or twice a year, compared with four to five times in previous generations. This has led to overgrazing and  degradation of the pastures and ecosystems.  This results in CO2 being released from the ecosystems and soils.

Following three years of research, funded by the Darwin Initiative, a new Nomad driven project has been developed under the Plan Vivo Standard, through a partnership between the University of Leicester and the Mongolian Society for Range Management. It is the first of its kind in Mongolia, creating performance based payments to herder families based on changes they are able to make which impact positively on the earths carbon levels. Much of this is about restoring the traditional nomadic way of life to reduce over grazing pressure on sensitive ecosystems.

 

The Challenge

  • ECOSYSTEM DEGRADATION & CO2 RELEASE
    As Nomads lose their traditional way of life and become sedentary in one place, over grazing degrades the ecosystem and soils, releasing carbon stored in the vegetation and soils.
  • LOSS OF TRADITIONAL NOMADIC LIFESTYLE
    A way of life is in decline. One that has evolved over many generations to align with the ecosystems and landscapes of Mongolia. There is an erosion of the value placed on traditional nomadic culture and practice and a drift to urban fringes.
  • BIODIVERSITY
    Native animal species reliant on the grasslands are impacted by herder overgrazing

MONGOLIAN NOMAD PROJECT

C-LEVEL 101VISIONS MICRO-DOCUMENTARY

Project impact

70,000Hectares of land

The project is operating in 3 regions of Mongolia. Tov Aimag, Arkanghai Aimag and Bayankhongor Soum.

60,000Tonnes CO2 sequestered

CO2 benefit is created by restoration of the grassland ecosystems and the subsequent uptake of carbon into the vegetation and soils.

98Families Engaged

People are organised into 3 traditional extended family groups called Heseg. By pooling resources and skills, the hesegs are able to sell finished products rather than raw materials, and fetch higher prices. Nomads are empowered by the value placed on their traditional way of life.

200People benefitting

Local herders are being financially compensated for protecting their local environment simply by adhering to traditional nomadic principles. Payments are improving livelihoods and food security, especially for the poorest and most vulnerable in the Hesegs.

6Animal Species protected

The Heseg undertake biodiversity surveys across their lands. Herders are licencing the cutting of trees to protect the Saxual Forests on the edge of the Gobi Desert and working together to stop illegal hunting. Herders are also planting indigenous trees to reduce demands on existing woodland and enhance soil carbon levels